Market Leadership Gives HRM Rex Goliath Something to Crow About

Fastest-Growing Premium Wine Brand Introduces Three Hot New Wines

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, April, 7, 2011 - Based on the legend of a 47 pound rooster named HRM (His Royal Majesty) Rex Goliath, (www.rexgoliath.com), Rex Goliath has overtaken Barefoot as the fastest growing brand in the Premium ($5-7.99) wine segment – the largest volume segment in the U.S. market. [1]

Total volume grew 74 percent, while dollar sales value grew at 62 percent over the last 52 weeks boasting six wines in the top 10 in their respective varietal categories – Cabernet Sauvignon, Free Range Red/Red Blend, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Shiraz and Zinfandel. [2]

Not one to rest on its nest, Rex Goliath has also introduced three hot new wines to its expanding flock – Free Range Red, Moscato and Sauvignon Blanc. Wines known for bold flavors, full body and big attitude, Rex is a rooster serious about a good time with great wine according to Marketing Director, Kim Moore.

“We have become known for producing quality, award-winning wines at excellent value and to build upon this terrific momentum, we saw an opportunity to extend the portfolio with three new wines that consumers are asking for: our proprietary red blend “Free Range Red”, Moscato and Sauvignon Blanc,” explained Moore.

The wines are quickly gaining market position with the Free Range Red launch in the fall of 2010 and Sauvignon Blanc and Moscato in early 2011. Moscato has quickly become the #3 Premium white varietal by volume and is also the fastest-growing white varietal. Sauvignon Blanc is now the #4 Premium white varietal by volume, and aptly named, “Free Range Red” – a blend of Syrah and Zinfandel – is part of a Premium varietal category that has grown 89 percent compared to a year ago. [3]

Rex Goliath also has earned praise from both consumers and critics. Testament to this, IMPACT Magazine honored Rex Goliath with the 2010 “Hot Brand Award” for the third year, which recognizes a new or existing brand that exceeded specific criteria based on sales from the previous year. The brand was also recently ranked #4 on a list of the 2010 “Top 30 Momentum Table Wine Brands” by Symphony IRI Group which ranks brands with >100,000 9L cases sold in the U.S. The wines have earned 12 Gold, Platinum and “Best in Class” medals over the past 12 months at national wine competitions, an impressive position by any measure.

Rex Goliath wines are offered in both 750ml and 1.5L sizes, and are priced at $7 and $13 respectively. Distributed by Constellation Wines U.S., Rex Goliath wines are available nationally at independent and chain retail outlets. For more about Rex Goliath wines, visit:www.rexgoliath.com.

 

About HRM Rex Goliath Wines
At the turn of the 20th century, HRM (His Royal Majesty) Rex Goliath was the treasured attraction of a Texas circus. People came from far and wide to behold the 47 lb. bird, billed as the “World’s Largest Rooster.” The Rex Goliath label replicates the one-of-a-kind vintage artwork from the circus banner that hung above Rex’s roost. Rex is proudly honored by these premium varietal wines.

 

About Constellation Wine U.S.
Constellation Wines U.S. (CWUS) is the largest wine company in the U.S. based upon sales dollar value. The portfolio includes such brands as Woodbridge by Robert Mondavi, Clos du Bois, Robert Mondavi Private Selection, Blackstone, Ravenswood, Robert Mondavi Winery, Simi, Estancia, Wild Horse, Arbor Mist and Paul Masson Grande Amber Brandy. CWUS and Vincor Canada comprise Constellation Wines North America, a division of Constellation Brands, Inc., a leading international producer and marketer of beverage alcohol in the wine, spirits and imported beer categories. 

 

Media Contact: Katie Vandermause, PR Manager, Constellation Wines U.S., 415-912-3860



[1] Source: Symphony IRI Group, Total U.S. Food & Drug, 52 weeks, ending March 20, 2011percent dollar growth in Top 10 Premium Brands
[2] Source: Symphony IRI Group, Total U.S. Food & Drug, 52 weeks, ending March 20, 2011
[3] Source: Symphony IRI Group, Total U.S. Food & Drug, 52 weeks, ending March 20, 2011